Gadgets and tech for viewing the solar eclipse

Many across the country will have the chance to "enjoy" a total solar eclipse for a few minutes come the early afternoon August 21. For those of us in the state of Georgia, this the first time since 1918. Sure you have to drive up to the very small northeast corner of the state to be directly in the path of totality, and be ready at about 2pm. If you aren't going to drive to see possibly the last total solar eclipse in your lifetime, you can find a rooftop, a field or meadow or even a bar patio to catch a "glimpse." Of course technology comes into play, as with anything else.

Here are some gadgets you might need for the eclipse. RoM Pack www.romoutdoors.com

Don't want to carry multiple bags to watch the solar eclipse? All you need in a backpack is the RoM Pack. The RōM Pack is a backpack you can fully transform into either a wearable poncho with a hood or a blanket that’s soft on one side and water resistant on the other. Also great for hunting trips and packing for sporting events. Relax and enjoy the solar eclipse on your RoM Pack.

Solar Eclipse Glasses Solar Eclipse glasses resemble 3-D movie glasses and sell for as little as $2. They are sold at Best Buys, Kirkland’s and Lowe’s stores. Many stores are sold out and won't be getting more inventory, so look around and don't look directly at the solar eclipse. Reputable vendors https://eclipse.aas.org/resources/solar-filters

Carmen Sol Bracelets Anything with "Sol" in its name must be perfect for the eclipse. Carmen Sol’s new bracelets are the perfect addition to any outfit for this Solar Eclipse. With their bright colors and stud accents, these water resistant jelly bracelets will set the scene! This is an epic celestial month! Are you a Leo or a Virgo? Wear your horoscope colors this solar eclipse! Leo: orange or yellow. Virgo: green or brown!

ENERGYbits Have your EnergyBits ready so you don't miss a moment of this great event. ENERGYbits is an effective, nutritionally dense source of mental and physical energy that is all natural and causes no stomach distress. This plant-based fuel will supercharge your workouts, runs, athletic performance, and help you stay up to watch the Solar Eclipse. This high protein snack reduces hunger, cravings and the need for caffeine and is an eco-friendly, sustainable food crop. Feel the difference. Your brain and body will say thank you.

Make your own viewing device here. Bonus: Apps for the Solar Eclipse NASA Total Solar Eclipse 2017 Countdown: NASA has created this website, https://eclipse2017.nasa.gov/, to guide you through the eclipse. You will find a live stream of the eclipse, an interactive eclipse map, a list of official eclipse events across the country, eclipse science and education activities, such as making a solar viewing projector or a 3D printable pinhole projector, eclipse art projects and much more. Total Solar Eclipse 2017: This free app from Exploratorium gives you access to Exploratorium’s live video streams of the total solar eclipse. You can tune in to 5 simultaneous video streams: live coverage hosted by Exploratorium educators and NASA scientists; live coverage in Spanish; a non-narrated, 3-hour live telescope view of the full eclipse as seen from Oregon; a non-narrated, 3-hour live telescope view of the full eclipse as seen from Wyoming; and a live telescope view with live musical sonification and accompaniment by the Kronos Quartet. The Great Photo App: ($2.99) – You don’t want to miss getting the best photo possible of this amazing event – AFTER you’ve put on your safety glasses – and this app can help. The Great Photo App provides interactive photography lessons. You learn about lighting, exposure, aperture, depth of field, white balancing, and much more. You also may want to check out this web site, www.photographyconcentrate.com. It provides an extensive guide on smartphone photography.

Remember, the shadow of the moon will first touch Georgia at 2:34 p.m. on Aug. 21 and leave the state at 2:40 p.m. The shadow of the moon passes by quickly, at about 1,800 miles per hour, according to NASA.